team 

VisionMix operates as a curatorial collective, led by Lucia King (UK) and Rashmi Sawhney (India).

 

Lucia King is a London-based Artist and Filmmaker who has shown her work extensively nationally and internationally. She is also a Lecturer in Moving Image at the University of Brighton. Drawing from her background as a doctoral researcher on artists film and documentary filmmakers’ practices in India (post 1990’s), her interest also lies in how artworks and films alter their significance and reading as they travel from one world region to another, and across varying exhibition and distribution platforms. Her curatorial thinking is also fuelled by questions pertaining to art and the political ecology of ‘self’, and the role of the author in art and filmmaking. Having co-curated all of the VisionMix events as founding director she has engaged the support of the associate international partners. The concept for the VisionMix network is that it will grow in a rhizomatic manner so that other curators will in future generate workshops in collaboration with the network, producing exhibitions, publications and wider debate in the lens-based media field adding strength to strength.

    


Rashmi Sawhney is a Bangalore-based academic and writer whose work deals with cinema and visual culture. She is currently faculty at Christ University, Bangalore. Rashmi lived in Ireland for eleven years, where she did her PhD and later took up a Lecturership at the Centre for Transcultural Research and Media Practice (www.ctmp.ie). Prior to joining Christ University, she was Associate Professor at the School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi. Her research, teaching, and publications have dealt with gender, migration, and more recently science and speculative fictions in the context of cinema.Her interest in science fiction arises from her interest in the relationship between history, the future and the present, and she sees science and speculative fictions as being ideological terrains as well as political processes through which collective social futures can be imagined. In her recent work, she has been exploring the science fictional imagination in India (editing Studies in South Asian Film and Media, 6,2 (2015)), Turkey, Japan, Argentina, Chile, and other countries outside the global North. Rashmi also headed the India Foundation for the Arts’ Arts Practice and Curatorship programmes for two years, and has been interested in the intersections between popular cinema and the visual arts and their increasingly overlapping global trajectories.